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Workshop: Building a Scholarly Presence with Humanities Commons

Are you looking for a place to establish an academic profile? Would you like to save your research, publications, syllabi, and datasets for long term preservation somewhere safe? Do you want to connect with colleagues from across the Humanities and beyond? Humanities Commons is an expansion of MLA Commons and is open to anyone.

Participants of this workshop will learn about the basic functions of Humanities Commons, see examples, and set up their own account. They will learn specifically how to:

  1. Set up an account and create a profile
  2. Join groups and create a group
  3. Deposit work into CORE, the subject repository for scholarly materials
  4. Create a website using built in WordPress functionality

There will be coffee and cookies provided!

Workshop: Building a Scholarly Presence with Humanities Commons

Are you looking for a place to establish an academic profile? Would you like to save your research, publications, syllabi, and datasets for long term preservation somewhere safe? Do you want to connect with colleagues from across the Humanities and beyond? Humanities Commons is an expansion of MLA Commons and is open to anyone.

Participants of this workshop will learn about the basic functions of Humanities Commons, see examples, and set up their own account. They will learn specifically how to:

  1. Set up an account and create a profile
  2. Join groups and create a group
  3. Deposit work into CORE, the subject repository for scholarly materials
  4. Create a website using built in WordPress functionality

There will be coffee and bagels provided!

DH Summer Work-a-Thon

Summer Co-Working Day / Work-a-Thon
Wednesday, August 16, 9am-5pm

Linton Hall, Room 9 (in the basement)

There will be coffee and snacks available, plus pizza for lunch.

Summer is wrapping up, which means you probably need to power through some work before the semester gets underway! Join us in Linton Hall for the day, August 16 (9am-5pm) to get some work done together. Bring whatever you’d like to work on, and there will be people available to provide assistance and/or to bounce around ideas. There will also be coffee, pizza, and various snacks to keep the energy up. Feel free to drop in for the whole day or just for an hour!

Anyone – graduate students, faculty, undergraduates, staff – is welcome to join us for this co-working day.

Digital humanities / digital scholarship experts who will be available are (with a more detailed scheduling coming soon):

DH Summer Work-a-Thon

Summer Co-Working Day / Work-a-Thon

Tuesday, March 7, 10am-5pm

LEADR, Old Horticulture 112

There will be coffee and snacks available, plus pizza for lunch.

Summer has begun, which means a time to relax… and a time to get some work done! Join us in LEADR for the day, May 22 (9am-5pm) to get some work done together. Bring whatever you’d like to work on, and there will be people available to provide assistance and/or to bounce around ideas. There will also be coffee, pizza, and various snacks to keep the energy up. Feel free to drop in for the whole day or just for an hour!

Anyone – graduate students, faculty, undergraduates, staff – is welcome to join us for this co-working day.

Digital humanities / digital scholarship experts who will be available are: 

Global Digital Humanities Symposium

Free and open to the public. Registration form will be released soon.

Digital Humanities at Michigan State University is proud to continue its symposium series on Global DH into its second year. Digital humanities scholarship continues to be driven by work at the intersections of of a range of distinct disciplines and an ethical commitment to preserve and broaden access to cultural materials. The most engaged global DH scholarship, that which MSU champions, values digital tools that enhance the capacity of scholarly critique to reflect a broad range of literary, historical, new media, and cultural positions, and diverse ways of valuing cultural production and knowledge work. Particularly valuable are strategies in which the digital form expresses a critique of the digital content and the position of the researcher to their material. 

With the growth of the digital humanities, particularly in under-resourced and underrepresented areas, a number of complex issues surface, including, among others, questions of ownership, cultural theft, virtual exploitation, digital rights, and the digital divide. We view the 2017 symposium as an opportunity to broaden the conversation about these issues. Scholarship that works across borders with foci on transnational partnerships and globally accessible data is especially welcome.

Michigan State University has been intentionally global for more than 60 years, with over 1,400 faculty involved in international research, teaching, and service. For the past 20 years, MSU has developed a strong research area in culturally engaged, global digital humanities. Matrix, a digital humanities and social science center at MSU, has done dozens of digital projects in West and Southern Africa that have focused on ethical and reciprocal relationships, and capacity building. WIDEhas set best practices for doing community engaged, international, archival work with the Samaritan Collections, Archive 2.0. Today many scholars in the humanities at MSU are engaged in digital projects relating to global, indigenous, and/or underrepresented groups and topics.

This symposium, which will include a mixture of presentation types, welcomes proposals by Friday, December 9, 11:59pm EST, related to any of these issues, and particularly on the following themes and topics:

Presentation Formats:

 

For more information visit the Global Digital Humanities Symposium website.

Global Digital Humanities Symposium CFP Extended Deadline

This symposium, which will include a mixture of presentation types, welcomes proposals related to any of these issues, and particularly on the following themes and topics:

Presentation Formats:

Submit a proposal here

 

For more information visit the Global Digital Humanities Symposium website.

Global Digital Humanities Symposium CFP due

This symposium, which will include a mixture of presentation types, welcomes proposals related to any of these issues, and particularly on the following themes and topics:

Presentation Formats:

Submit a proposal here

 

For more information visit the Global Digital Humanities Symposium website.

Conference Report – MSU Well-Represented at HASTAC 2016

Conference travel is always a bit stressful for me. Between dealing with travel concerns, presenting, and networking, I’ve never found it easy to relax and enjoy the experience of just being at a new place. Happily, that was not the case at the 2016 HASTAC Conference, which I attended thanks to the HASTAC Scholars program. While HASTAC 2016 took place at Arizona State University, it was easy to feel at home, as the connections to Michigan State were present everywhere I looked.

The first day of HASTAC is dedicated to the HASTAC Scholars unconference. This half-day event allows junior scholars to meet and discuss major issues, trends, and concerns in an informal setting. Having had to opportunity to help with the unconference at MSU in 2015, I was asked to return in 2016 to help lead this year’s meeting. Joining me were Allegra Smith, who earned her MA from MSU in 2015, and Mirabeth Braude, who did the same this year. Together, we led an international group of graduate students as we discussed issues ranging from the ethics of community based projects to how to manage privacy concerns when working with students on digital projects. Over three breakout sessions, we learned about how our fellow Scholars applied for grants, used technology in their classrooms, and worked to advocate for change in their universities.

That evening was the opening mixer, and again MSU was well represented. While I was able to meet students and professors from Belfast, New York, Los Angeles, and Dallas, I also met people from MATRIX and H-Net, digital humanities groups at Michigan State. It was over these conversations where I learned that I didn’t need to travel to be exposed to new and innovated digital humanities work, as there is work being done on my own campus that I didn’t know about. I left that night with appointments to meet with both groups once we returned home.

The following day was the first full day of HASTAC 2016, and again MSU was well-represented. New WRAC professor Dr. Dawn Opel ran registration for the conference, and served as the first face that most people saw when they arrived on campus. She led a group of graduate and undergraduate students from Arizona State who helped keep the conference flowing smoothly. On the program for the day were a variety of talks and panels with MSU faculty and students, who covered a variety of subjects. Mirabeth led a lightning talk on student documentaries, Deborah Margolis, Aaron Collie, Robin Dean and Devin Higgins, from MSU Libraries, led a talk on archiving Holocaust photography, and I joined a panel on performing arts to talk about how we can bring lessons from arts projects into our teaching practices.

Friday again saw MSU take center stage, as Dr. Liza Potts, Director of the WIDE at MSU, gave the conference’s keynote talk. Her talk, which focused on MSU’s Experience Architecture major and the digital work taking place in the College of Arts and Letters. She spotlighted the work of graduate and undergraduate students at Michigan State, including Jack Hennes, Minh-Tam Nguyen, and Emily Dallaire, during her talk. The keynote was followed by another full day of talks, with more than a half dozen Michigan State students or faculty on the program.

That evening saw the end of my conference, though not the end of my HASTAC experience. After meeting Cody Mejeur, a PhD student in English at MSU, we discovered that we have overlapping research interests. Based on our conversation at this year’s HASTAC conference, we plan to collaborate across departments to develop a project for a future conference. Personally, I’m hoping that we have it ready in time for HASTAC 2017 in Orlando, so we can continue to keep our university well-represented at the conference.

Global Digital Humanities Symposium

This event is free and open to the public.

Digital humanities has developed in a range of disciplines and locations across the globe. Initially emergent from initiatives in textual encoding, database building, or critiques of design and media cultures, the field is increasingly drawn together. Present scholarship works at the intersections of what had been disparate approaches. Much digital humanities scholarship is driven by an ethical commitment to preserve and broaden access to cultural materials. The most engaged global DH scholarship values digital tools that enhance the capacity of scholarly critique to reflect a broad range of histories, as well as present geographical and cultural positions. Projects that seek to bring grant resources from the West are often met with well-developed and challenging critiques emergent around the globe from communities deeply engaged in their own cultural preservation, as well as in building relationships with other similarly engaged scholars. This symposium, which will include an extended workshop and mixture of presentation types, engages squarely with issues of power, access, and equity as they affect scholarship in the digital humanities.

The invited speakers and local presenters at this two-day symposium will address how the interdisciplinary practices of digital humanities can and should speak to the global cultural record and the contemporary situation of our planet. Of particular interest is work relevant to or stemming from challenges in the Global South. The symposium seeks to strengthen networks of exchange among DH scholars nationally and internationally.

Themes and topics of this symposium will include:

Find out more at http://msuglobaldh.org/

D3 Js Workshop

Instructor: Emily Dolson

D3 (which stands for Data Driven Documents) is a Javascript library that enables you to display data in a flexible way. Since it’s a Javascript library, these visualizations can easily be shared either offline or via the internet. The option to add interactive elements to your visualization lends itself to making your data easy for others to explore. During this workshop we’ll cover the basics of using d3.js to visualize data. No prior web programming experience required (we’ll teach you the necessary Javascript and html), but this workshop is aimed at people with some programming experience.

Free + snacks and coffee will be provided.

RSVP at go.cal.msu.edu/d3js